Our Blog often covers issues associated with government contracts protests (like, for example, protests at the GAO, Court of Federal Claims, and size protests at the SBA).  The point of those posts is to highlight ways that disappointed offerors can “get back in the game” by challenging an improper award made

Just last week, we looked at the importance for small business contractors to check their SAM.gov profiles to make sure they are properly certified as small.  Incorrect information can lead to a variety of problems, not the least of which is potentially losing out on a small business set-aside contracting opportunity.

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This point was refined

Contractors that want to improve their proposal drafting skills (and win more contract awards) should always keep an eye on the news and learn from others’ mistakes.  Understanding an agency’s award rationale can provide a competitive advantage and keep you well-positioned to receive the next contract.

And, sometimes, simply following instructions and staying within the

As we previously broke down in detail here, an Organization Conflict of Interest (OCI) exists when work performed on a federal contract leads to an unfair competitive advantage or impaired objectivity.  Federal contractors must establish appropriate safeguards against OCI because a finding of OCI can lead to losing a contract or, worse, suspension or

Late is late. All government contractors know the rule.  Submissions must be received by the Agency at the time indicated, or else risk being excluded.  Still, as we start the New Year, it bears repeating because of the new and exotic ways we still see the rule popping up and harming contractors.

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Today – we

Bid protests come with many moving parts and issues to consider.  From documenting the government’s error, to scheduling a debriefing, to figuring out how and when to file — time can start to move pretty quickly.

While all of those issues are undoubtedly important – we here at Fox find that it is best to

Picture this:  After losing out on a lucrative Federal contract, you realize that an error within the solicitation led to the improper scoring of your company’s technical proposal.  In other words, you deserve the contract, but an error by the agency means that someone else got the award.  Aware of your rights and the tight