Contractors intending to submit a Request for Equitable Adjustment or Claim on a government contract need to be aware of the implications of bilateral modifications.

In simple terms, a bilateral modification is a supplement to your company’s contract with the government that is signed by both you and the government.  The agency can use a

It is common for government contractors to file claims on federal projects where there are government-directed changes to the contract that add time or scope.

But what if – instead of adding time and/or scope – the government de-scopes work from the contract by issuing a partial termination?  A recent successful claim shows that the

Government contractors are frequently faced with the situation where they are owed additional time or are entitled to damages from the government on a contract.  For example, the government might be responsible for delays to the project schedule.  Or it might direct changes to the contract that make it more expensive to perform.

There

Today, we have a question for our federal construction readers — If your project is operating within an anticipated budget, are you still entitled to the additional costs associated with a differing site condition?  Recently, the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals (CBCA) answered our question with a resounding yes.

This point is particularly important

After filing a claim under the Contract Disputes Act (CDA), the contracting officer may notify you that a final decision will be issued within “X” days after certain pre-conditions are met, such as:

  • Providing additional documentation supporting your claims or damages;
  • Attending a meeting to discuss your claims; or
  • Answering certain question allegedly required for

Bottom Line Up Front:  It is hard to get through a large-scale construction project without hitting a bump in the road in the form of dispute between the owner, general / prime contractor, subcontractors, suppliers, sureties, and so on.  Construction projects have tight deadlines and multiple moving parts, which tends to breed costly and time-consuming

As a contractor on a federal project, how often do you interact with the agency’s contracting officer?  Given the state of today’s understaffed acquisition workforce, the answer is probably not very often, if at all.  Instead, you more often find yourself dealing with a varied cast of characters during contract performance – including CORs, COTRs,

Today, a question for federal contractors:  Did you know that there is a way to “speed up” your claims under the Contract Disputes Act?  In his recent publication, Reggie Jones, a partner in Fox Rothschild’s Washington, D.C. Office and the Chair of our Government Contracts Practice Group explains that there is – and that