Contractors who have filed or have considered filing a Bid Protest based on a mistake by an agency know that they have very little time to recognize an issue and take action before the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

  • Typically, a protest challenging the award of a contract must be filed within 10 days (calendar, not

Every government contractor that begins performance on a new engagement has the same basic goal – superior performance that bolsters the company’s bottom line and garners excellent past performance ratings from the agency.

But, when the contract ends, will your company’s status as a successful incumbent contractor increase the odds of winning future follow-on

Winning bid protests all share one common theme – the government erred somewhere in the procurement process and the contractor was unfairly prejudiced as a result.  It is then up to the contractor to expend the time, effort, and resources necessary just to return to the status quo of basic fairness.

Fortunately for contractors, the

Government agencies have ample discretion when it comes to corrective action in response to a bid protest.  A recent GAO bid protest shows that contractors must tread lightly when it comes to challenging that discretion.

Unlike negotiations in the private sector, power plays against the government can end in lost contracting opportunities.

The