Organizational Conflict of Interest (OCI)

Organizational conflicts of interest (or “OCI”) generally exist when one party has access to nonpublic information as part of its performance on a government contract.

OCI — or even the appearance of OCI — can be a landmine for Federal contractors.  Unresolved OCI can lead to exclusion from a contract competition, contract termination, and even

For contractors, defending (and overcoming) bid protests that challenge contract awards based on alleged Organizational Conflicts of Interest (OCI) may hinge on what a contractor does at the very beginning of the procurement process.  Whether the contractor revealed, acknowledged, addressed, and documented potential OCI with the Contracting Officer (CO) could determine the fate of the

As we previously broke down in detail here, an Organization Conflict of Interest (OCI) exists when work performed on a federal contract leads to an unfair competitive advantage or impaired objectivity.  Federal contractors must establish appropriate safeguards against OCI because a finding of OCI can lead to losing a contract or, worse, suspension or

Bottom Line Up Front:  OCI exists when work performed by a contractor on a federal contract may: (a) result in an unfair competitive advantage for the contractor; or (b) impair the contractor’s objectivity in performing federal contract work.  OCI or the appearance of OCI must be avoided at all costs because OCI can lead to