Bid protests at the Government Accountability Office (GAO) have spawned a distinct area of the law.  With multiple evaluation schemes to consider, there are an ever-growing number of strategies for disappointed offerors to challenge alleged agency procurement errors.

Just like there are best practices for bid protests, there are also strategies to avoid at all costs.  Chief among the arguments a protester should steer clear of is “mere disagreement” with the agency.

In a nut shell, “mere disagreements” arise where the protester challenges the agency’s decision based only on the notion that it deserved a better score, more strengths, better adjectival rating (and so on).  These arguments do not identify mistakes by the agency – they just wish the agency reached a different result during the evaluation.

GAO is not shy about denying “mere disagreement” protests out of hand.  For example, in a recent bid protest decision concerning an Army IT support services contract, GAO found that the protester’s arguments concerning the number of strengths/weaknesses and adjectival ratings assigned by GAO did not offer any grounds to sustain the protest.

The underlying rationale for the decision is GAO’s unwillingness to substitute its own judgment for that of the agency.  In other words, GAO finds that the agency is in the best position to assess its own needs and evaluate proposals.

GAO is also unwilling to split hairs when it comes to evaluation ratings.  For example, in this case, the protester unsuccessfully argued that the agency’s determination that a portion of its technical proposal included only strengths and no weaknesses should have automatically resulted in the assignment of a “significant strength.”  GAO disagreed, finding that the RFP defined a significant strength as an aspect of a proposal that would be “appreciably advantageous to the government during contract performance.” While the protester’s proposal may have exceeded certain requirements, GAO would not step in to overrule the agency’s determination that the proposal did not significantly exceed those requirements.

So, if “mere disagreement” is out, does that mean it is impossible to challenge an agency’s evaluation of your proposal?  Not at all.

The key is to focus on the essential element of all bid protests – a procurement error by the agency resulting in competitive prejudice (i.e., a diminished opportunity for contract award).  Rather than focus on ratings or strengths, the protest should address specific errors made during the evaluation process.  Did the agency misinterpret part of your proposal?  Or overlook something altogether?  Did the agency offer the awardee an advantage that your firm did not receive?

While these kinds of errors may be difficult to pinpoint at first, a skilled debriefing strategy can help draw them out.

The bottom line is that bid protests require a significant investment of time and resources.  If your firm’s only arguments amount to mere disagreement with the agency, those resources are likely better spent elsewhere.

Two pieces of advice I often provide to government contractors are:

1.When responding to a solicitation, give the government precisely what it asks for – right down to the letter.  This includes providing the information in the correct section of your proposal.  The agency will not play hide-and-seek; and

2.  If you think there is something askew with a procurement or award decision – act fast.  There are lots of different deadlines enforced by GAO, but they all come and go very quickly.  A contractor typically must act within 10 days of when it knows (or should have known) of a protestable issue.  An even shorter timeline (5 days) applies in order to obtain an often essential stay of contract award and/or performance.

These concepts converge when it comes to bid protests related to defective solicitation terms.  GAO Bid Protest Rule 21.2(a)(1) states that a protest alleging improprieties or errors on a solicitation that are apparent on the face of the solicitation must be filed prior to bid opening or the closing date for the receipt of initial proposals.

In other words, a contractor cannot adopt a wait-and-see approach.  The protest must be filed before the contractor submits its bid or proposal.

In a recent GAO decision, a contractor gambled on waiting and ultimately lost the protest and a chance at the contract award.  The procurement at issue involved an Army contract for LED lighting.  The protester believed that its proposal was lower-priced that the awardee’s proposal and exceeded the solicitation requirements.

The Army rejected the protester’s proposal as non-responsive.  The solicitation included three categories of lights.  CLINS 1 and 2 required “type two” LED lights while CLIN 3 required “type three.”  All lights were also required to have a minimum glare rating of “two.”  According to the agency, the protester’s proposal included “type three” lights for all CLINS and a glare rating of “three.”

The protester did not dispute that its proposal differed from the solicitation requirements, but argued that the requirements were unclear and unreasonably restrictive.  With ever getting to the merits of these arguments, GAO denied the protest as an untimely challenge to the solicitation:   “To the extent that the protester now argues that it was unreasonable for the agency to have a minimum requirement for the type of light to be procured, or that the [solicitation’s] technical specifications were unclear, these arguments allege improprieties in the solicitation that, in order to be timely, were required to be raised prior to the closing time for receipt of quotations.  Accordingly, these allegations are untimely and will not be considered.”

At the end of the day, it did not matter whether (or not) the LED lights offered by the proposal were “better.”  The contractor did not follow the solicitation to the letter and lost as a result.

The lesson here for contractors is an easy one.  Address any solicitation uncertainties early and to your complete satisfaction.  Most issues can be addressed through Q&A or other pre-bid closing communications.  If problems are resolved, proceed and comply with the solicitation as-written.  If a defect remains even after your best efforts, the only solution is a bid protest filed before the closing date for proposals.

Bid protests come with many moving parts and issues to consider.  From documenting the government’s error, to scheduling a debriefing, to figuring out how and when to file — time can start to move pretty quickly.

While all of those issues are undoubtedly important – we here at Fox find that it is best to always start by taking a step back and looking at the big picture.  And what is the most important question for any government contractor considering a bid protest?  How to win and get the contract!

The goal of any bid protest should be on correcting the government’s error and making sure that your business gets the contract that it deserves.  There are several paths available, but they are not all created equal – and they certainly are not “one size fits all.”  The different protest venues (the primary three being: Agency Level protests, GAO protests, and Court of Federal Claims protests) each offer different pros and cons – and your choice of venue can have a very real impact on your businesses’s protest experience.

gao

Today, we are highlighting winning strategies for GAO bid protests.  The GAO exists exclusively as a venue for resolving government procurement errors.  Unlike a traditional court setting, the GAO is built for speed and efficiency – the goal in each GAO protest is to reach a final resolution within 100 days from the date of filing.

The GAO model for resolving protests certainly has its advantages – most notably, your case can be resolved quickly and for a relatively low cost.  However, that speed and efficiency comes at a price.  There is very little in the way of due process or discovery before the GAO – meaning that protests are typically decided based on the face of the protest itself.

With these considerations in mind, we recommend GAO bid protests as the ideal forum resolving protests involving open and obvious government errors – in other words, procurement mistakes that can be easily understood and corrected.  Under those circumstances, the GAO offers the best and quickest avenue to filing a winning protest and getting the contract award for your company.

On the other hand, if your protest involves complex factual or legal issues, the GAO probably is not right for you.  Typically, there just is not enough time for the case to fully develop – and the GAO will tend to lean on the government’s discretion when it views the case as a close call.  For those kinds of bid protests, we recommend filing a complaint in the Court of Federal Claims, which operates more like a traditional court and allows the time to fully flesh out a complicated case.

We invite you to take a look at our Guide to Winning GAO Bid Protests, which offers a complete rundown on the types of cases best suited for the GAO.