One of the primary benefits offered by the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) mentor-protégé programs is the ability to operate outside the normal rules governing affiliation.  Generally speaking, SBA allows mentors to provide assistance (including technical, management, and financial assistance) to their protégé firms without fear of creating affiliation.  That is, so long as the

Small business owners must always be mindful of what it means to be “small” in the world of government contracting.  After all, losing that small business size status means losing direct access to the lucrative world of set-aside contracts and the SBA’s socio-economic programs.

In the past, we’ve discussed the SBA’s rules on affiliation

For small business government contractors, the question of affiliation should always be at the top of the list of priorities.  A finding of affiliation between your business and another business (and, in particular, a large business) could be enough to lose your small business size status – and the ability to compete for those coveted

The future is now for government contractors.  A new Small Business Administration (SBA) regulation finalizes the long-anticipated expansion of the small business mentor-protégé program.  This major policy shift vastly expands access to set-aside contracts previously reserved for performance only by small businesses.  Government contractors – both small and large – need to create a

For small businesses, understanding the Small Business Administration’s rules concerning affiliation is vital for establishing and maintaining a certain size threshold.  Relationships that are deemed too close by the SBA can lead to a finding of affiliation and, ultimately, the loss of the ability to chase set-aside work.

The rules of affiliation are notoriously ambiguous.