lowest price technically acceptable (LPTA)

In a recent post, I discussed new legislation that could signal an uptick in Best Value procurements for complex service-based contracts.  In the view of many (including me), more Best Value RFPs is a win/win for both contractors and the government.

As a quick refresher, Best Value procurements utilize a Best Value Tradeoff

For government contractors frustrated by Federal agencies’ use of Lowest-Price Technically-Acceptable solicitations on complex services contracts – help may be on the way.

As I’ve discussed before, LPTA procurements can have a chilling effect on contractors that are able to provide increased technical benefits to the government – but at an increased price.  LPTA

We often discuss the need for government contractors to Read and React when responding to a solicitation:  (1) Read the RFP and understand all of the requirements and limitations and (2) React to the RFP’s evaluation scheme by playing the appropriate strengths and minimizing weaknesses.  And sometimes, the best reaction is knowing the value

The federal government has exhibited an increased use of the “lowest priced technically acceptable” (or LPTA) approach for awarding complex contracts.  Earlier this month, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, Mr. Frank Kendall, issued a memorandum on this point – discussing appropriate use of LPTA source selection processes and associated contract

Sequestration.  Budget cuts.  Reduced spending.  Federal contractors know that these are challenging times – but is your business adapting in time to keep pace?

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One consequence of the shrinking federal marketplace is a noticeable shift away from “best value” procurements and towards awarding contracts to the “lowest price, technically acceptable” (LPTA) offeror.  In other words,