Best Value and Lowest Price Technically Acceptable (LPTA) procurements trigger very different bidding obligations for contractors.

As I’ve detailed in this space before, Best Value procurements place limited importance on price.  While cost is (always) a factor, a bidder can overcome a higher price by demonstrating its technical expertise and ability to add value

Every government contractor that begins performance on a new engagement has the same basic goal – superior performance that bolsters the company’s bottom line and garners excellent past performance ratings from the agency.

But, when the contract ends, will your company’s status as a successful incumbent contractor increase the odds of winning future follow-on

In a recent post, I discussed new legislation that could signal an uptick in Best Value procurements for complex service-based contracts.  In the view of many (including me), more Best Value RFPs is a win/win for both contractors and the government.

As a quick refresher, Best Value procurements utilize a Best Value Tradeoff

We often discuss the need for government contractors to Read and React when responding to a solicitation:  (1) Read the RFP and understand all of the requirements and limitations and (2) React to the RFP’s evaluation scheme by playing the appropriate strengths and minimizing weaknesses.  And sometimes, the best reaction is knowing the value

Government contractors responding to RFPs understand the need to read the fine print.

Mostly commonly, we discuss this topic in terms of pure proposal acceptability.  Protest decisions from the GAO and Court of Federal Claims make it abundantly clear that the burden falls on the contractor to follow directions and include all of the