Yesterday, the Small Business Administration (SBA) issued new proposed rules that could dramatically change the landscape for small businesses, as well as large federal contractors that team with small business concerns.

With narrow, limited exceptions, the SBA regulations currently provide that two businesses that joint venture to perform federal contracts will be considered affiliated.  Affiliation

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As the calendar turns to February, many of us have already let slide our personal resolutions for the New Year.  However, even if you’ve already forgotten what the inside of your gym looks like, there are still some achievable resolutions that you can keep.

The Small Business Administration (SBA) published a list of seven resolutions

As we’ve covered, the U.S. government sets defined goals concerning the percentage of federal contracting dollars that must go to small businesses.  This situation can be a double-edged sword for small business contractors.  On one hand – more contracts, more work, and more money are up for grabs.  But, on the other hand, sometimes

The SBA Inspector General recently determined that over $400 million in small business awards were awarded to firms that were not eligible small businesses at the time of award.  These awards were apparently issued in error by various agencies, but were used to inflate the federal government’s overall small business award results.

Further, the SBA

Recently, we discussed the federal government’s success in meeting the small business prime contracting goal in FY 2013.  Unfortunately, federal contractors did not have as much success when it comes to small business subcontracting.

Like small business prime contracting, federal agencies set goals for the percentage of subcontracts that will be awarded by federal

The U.S. Small Business Administration (“SBA”), as well as each federal agency, establishes goals every year to promote small business participation in federal government contracting.

For the first time since 2005, the federal government met its small business contracting goal last year – awarding over $83 billion to small businesses.  This is great news for

Rounding out our week-long Blog series on the Small Business Administration’s (“SBA”) small business development programs, today we’ll take a look at the Women-Owned Small Business Program (or “WOSB”).

Like the other programs we’ve examined, the key feature of WOSB Program participation is access to contracts set-aside for exclusive performance by Program members.  In

One topic that I will be covering extensively as part of this Blog is the Small Business Administration’s (“SBA”) small business development programs – that is, government programs exclusively created for the use and benefit of small businesses owned and operated by contractors in certain socioeconomic groups identified as traditionally disadvantaged or under-represented.  Through these