Government Contracting 101

One of the primary risks facing construction contractors is subsurface or unexpected physical conditions discovered after the work begins (commonly known as a Differing Site Condition).  When such conditions are encountered on a federal government project, contractors need to: (1) properly document the condition, (2) notify the government, and (3) preserve the right to

Government contractors responding to RFPs understand the need to read the fine print.

Mostly commonly, we discuss this topic in terms of pure proposal acceptability.  Protest decisions from the GAO and Court of Federal Claims make it abundantly clear that the burden falls on the contractor to follow directions and include all of the

Small business owners must always be mindful of what it means to be “small” in the world of government contracting.  After all, losing that small business size status means losing direct access to the lucrative world of set-aside contracts and the SBA’s socio-economic programs.

In the past, we’ve discussed the SBA’s rules on affiliation

As I’ve covered extensively on this blog, the U.S. government is conducting a wide-spread and on-going crackdown on contracting fraud.  Under the Civil False Claims Act alone, the government clawed back $3.5 billion in 2015.  And 2016 is poised to be another banner year.

One of the hot topics in fraud prevention of

Government contractors are frequently faced with the situation where they are owed additional time or are entitled to damages from the government on a contract.  For example, the government might be responsible for delays to the project schedule.  Or it might direct changes to the contract that make it more expensive to perform.

There

For small business government contractors, the question of affiliation should always be at the top of the list of priorities.  A finding of affiliation between your business and another business (and, in particular, a large business) could be enough to lose your small business size status – and the ability to compete for those coveted

Every government contractor that files a bid protest has the same goal in mind – corrective action.  The agency made a procurement error and changes need to be made.

But just because the agency takes corrective action does not mean it will be the corrective action your firm wants.  Contractors should take the time to

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is establishing a new system for filing bid protests – the Electronic Protest Docketing System (EPDS).  GAO promises that the new system will be both “secure” and “easy-to-use.”

This week, GAO rolled out a new set of instructions that offers greater insight into the new e-filing process.

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The instructions

Our Blog often covers issues associated with government contracts protests (like, for example, protests at the GAO, Court of Federal Claims, and size protests at the SBA).  The point of those posts is to highlight ways that disappointed offerors can “get back in the game” by challenging an improper award made

Novations are the government contracting equivalent of M&A in the private sector – the process through which a government contract can be transferred from one business to another (without violating the Anti-Assignment Act).

There are many reasons that a novation might be necessary.  A business holding a government contract could be acquired by another